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06-11-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,056
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 41
Post ID: 10759
Reply to: 10757
Novel Instrument Syndrome
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It has been a long time since I enjoyed "early music", and I think I can pretty much trace my falling out with the genre to the meteoric rise of Christopher Hogwood and Company, with their twistedandpained "authentic" expression, using the well-researched, "period" instruments.  Sorry, but the most charitable thoughts I can muster on the matter at this time is that they (CH&C), like Sir Nevil Mariner and AoSMitF, just did too much too fast, and I was not only bowled over but also knocked flat and left weary and disgusted in their wake(s).

HOWEVER (being nothing if not Mercurial): At the same time, during my long disaffection with "early music", I have yet compulsively picked up just about every oddball "classical" LP I have noticed, inlcuding glass harmonica and recorder.  I actually like the sound of both instruments - at times - and also there are apparently some compositions for them that are not instant-sleep-inducing "correct" versions, but they date to a happier day and time before anyone made such a gigantic deal of "authenticity', but they just played the piece well, and damn the torpedoes.

Because of or despite the foregoing, I will look for the performance you tout, with the same high hopes that prompted the idiotic purchase of my most recent Gregorian Chant CD...


Best regards,
Paul S

07-22-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 42
Post ID: 11151
Reply to: 8359
Prokofiev’s Second Concerto
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It is not unknown work to me, I never was hugely thrilled about it but I heard it today for the first time that I suddenly turned to like it. Ironically it was the performance today that I liked but rather it was a bliss to me, an inspiration why I did not like it before.

Today I heard Kissin played Prokofiev’s Second Concertos with London’s Philharmonia Orchestra under Ashkenazy. Evgeny Kissin was at the top of his shape – flawless but empathycal technicality and flooding the nuances of melody with barbaric pianisic chops. The notes taste like tune cans in super market… It did not have on merits but how truly musical was it? Well, probably it was as musical as the Baron Cohen’s film “Bruno” is funny….

Still, listening Kissin it suddenly comes to me how to play Prokofiev’s Second Concertos in order the concert did not created just a motor reaction of pianisic impressiveness but rather work as a serious piano concerto…

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
07-25-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,056
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 43
Post ID: 11184
Reply to: 9176
'55 vs. '81 Re-set, Anyone?
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Add me to the list of people who think Gould's '55 Golberg sets the bar.  I recently compared the '55 and '81, and now I appreciate the '55 more than ever.  Sure, it's fast, but it's certainly not like it gets away from hm or anything.

OTOH, I found/find the '81 to be rather eccentric, with Gould seeming to get lost in "alternate" (and sometimes antithetical) threads.  Maybe G had done it so often that this was just a new way to play it; or maybe his perceptions were skewed...

I agree that the '55 is "straight up", and I can see where one might feel steam-rollered by it if not ready for it; but boy, does G pull it off, IMO.  Nowhere to hide, and no reason to hide.


Best regards,
Paul S
07-26-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Lbjefferies7
Southern California
Posts 49
Joined on 01-11-2008

Post #: 44
Post ID: 11185
Reply to: 11184
'55 Gould Vs. '81 Gould
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It appears that I need both.  I have had quite a relationship with these pieces.  I go back and forth between them.  I think that this is purely because of the differences between young and old Gould.  For me, they need eachother, in a way.  I think some of the things in '55 were indicative of Gould still finding what he really wanted to do. 

I am very much more inlined to like the '81 because of its clear purpose of creating a rhythmic design to the Goldberg Variations.  It's more logical...more structured.

However, the '55 performance is Bach in the eyes of romanticism.  Kind of like Richter did with The Well-Tempered Clavier, but much less intensity.  It seems kind of like I.M. Pei's Pyramid at the Louvre only in reverse.  '81 is just the Pyramid.  Maybe more like the Getty Center.

I've recently been quite fascinated by the unorthodox piano regulation in his performances of the Two and Three Part Inventions (1963).  I have never encountered a pianist using (really using!) too-strong repetition springs, not enough drop, and perhaps tweeked back checks.  He certainly changed between '55 and '81, but he was always a musical genius.

Interesting that he apparently took 5 years to find his piano.  I have been surrounded by pianos for about 20 years and have found exactly two exceptional pianos.  Two out of about 2300.  I can't wait untill that next one comes.

LBJ


I'm not interested in having an orchestra sound like itself. I want it to sound like the composer. Leonard Bernstein
07-26-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,056
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 45
Post ID: 11186
Reply to: 11185
Not For Sale
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LBJ, in the bright clear air of morning, it looks like I made yet another "tired" post, after a long day out in the heat.  I actually love and respect both versions, but it was not my aim or desire to include the relevant back stories, probably because I was just too tired when I got hooked by JL's earlier post.

I am somewhat surprised to hear your thought that the '55 was "Romantic", but I guess I can hear a sort of very fleeting Romanticism.  And now that you mention it, I do react to parts of it that way, pre-programed, as I am, with the "sense" of Romanticism.

I certainly agree with the idea of G "creating a rhythmic design" in the '81; in fact, it's as though he aims (and in some cases he is "waiting") to "channel" the work most of the time, and I think he winds up taking a few weird turns with respect to his attention, relative to any musical/temporal thread one might expect/anticipate. Certainly not Romantic, or...; but, just Gould; almost like a very long jazz concert.

Yes, there are too few truly great instruments out there, and what a difference they can make when played by the  greats.  I wish that Gieseking had cared more, and I will be forever greatful that Gould, Richter, Malcuzynski and others did care.

Best regards,
Paul
07-27-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
clarkjohnsen
Boston, MA, US
Posts 289
Joined on 06-02-2004

Post #: 46
Post ID: 11198
Reply to: 11184
Gould's Bach
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Personally I think his finest Bach is the set of Partitas.

Widening the scope, his single disc of Brahms Intermezzi etc. is nearly incomparable.

clark
07-29-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 47
Post ID: 11221
Reply to: 8359
Glazunov 9th unfinished symphony.
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Glazunovs’ symphonies are not well know but his 5, 6, 7, 8 symphonies are quite good with some movements from the 6th and 8th are almost great. Glazunov’s composed 9th symphony, well, only first movement and then he died. The 9th symphony practically never played, l I never hear it and last night WHRB broadcasted it with Dmitri Kitaenko leading some kind of Russian orchestra. It was very interesting, I think I will get myself this recording…..

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
08-08-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
JANDL100


Forest of Dean, UK
Posts 71
Joined on 09-27-2007

Post #: 48
Post ID: 11316
Reply to: 11221
Elgar 2nd Symphony - Vernon Handley
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Although I am a Brit and have been an avid fan of classical including British music (RVW is my fave) for several decades, I just haven't been able to appreciate what the hell Elgar was on about in his 2 symphonies.  (I've loved his '3rd' as completed by Anthony Payne since I first heard it).

I've also generally had a fairly passionate dislike for the conducting skills of the recently deceased Vernon Handley.

But every know and then, if only to try and keep an open mind, I have another listen.

This time around, I followed the advice of some music critics and bought the Elgar 2 conducted by Handley on EMI.   Well, maybe two wrongs do make a right!
In this case, this is certainly the situation for me.   Something, just a smidgeon, captivated me from the start, although the other 99% was still unintelligible to me!  I have now listened to this recording about 8 or 9 times in the course of a few days - and I am now totally bowled over by the music. Fantastic. What were seemingly disjointed chords now coalesce into a magnificent whole.  And what great sound quality too - oh, that brass!   My love of Vaughan Williams' symphonic (and other) works is undimmed - but Elgar's 2nd symphony is fast approaching their exalted level in my view.  I must now try other versions - I have also just bought Handley's Elgar 1, perhaps that will work some magic on me, too!


Jerry
09-07-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 49
Post ID: 11686
Reply to: 8359
Alfred Schnittke’s Psalms of Repentance
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After a 10 years or I have today wonderful listening of Schnittke’s Psalms of Repentance.  It is Swedish Radio Choir under Tonu Kaljuste on ECM New Series. As anything more unearthy-sublime then the 12the psalm? In fact it not only the 12 – I like all of them, I like them a lot. It is certainly not for dally listening and your need to be a VERY special mood to be able to listen the Psalms of Repentance. You will know what I mean if you in the mood….

The caT


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-08-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 50
Post ID: 11705
Reply to: 8359
The Lute Music of Johann Sebastian Bach
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It is by Eduardo Eguez and it is transcendently good. I still miss that Glen Gould psychedelic “nervousness” but I do not think that Lute or Guitar can play like a percussion instilment. Still, for whomever it is the Eguez’s Bach is just phenomenal. It has become my Sunday morning music .

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-12-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 51
Post ID: 11719
Reply to: 8359
Maria Balint and Chausson’s Poeme/Paganini First
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Bought the CD not become this recording that has became my performance of the week. I had and still have no idea who Maria Balint is. She played with Budapest Symphony Orchestra with György Lehel conducting. I bought this CD because the CD had the Gary Karr’s with London Symphony take on the “Introduction and Variations on Themes by Rossini”. The Karr’s Rossini was on boring side but the Chausson’s Poem on the same CD was surprisingly good, the Budapest Symphony was very good as well. The same CD has Balint/Budapest/Lehel take on Paganini’s First Violin Concerto – also very good.

The Balint started the Chausson’s Poem with many problems but she good better and better and in whole like it very much.  Well,  the Balint’s Chausson’s Poem is not Oistrakh with Munch and Boston and not Oleg Kogan with Russian Symphony from end 50s, not Ferras with National Orchestra of Belgiumfrom beginning of 50s, not the Kreisler  with Philadelphia from 40s and not Francescatti  with Ormandy  and Philadelphia from 50s. Still it is WAY more sophisticated then just another violinist…. I wonder what happen with this girl and why she is no where…

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-15-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 52
Post ID: 11749
Reply to: 8359
Grieg String Quartet in G minor, Op. 27
fiogf49gjkf0d

Meow, meow, meow!

I was today a good kitty and I have a wonderfully purring section today. The WHRB broadcasted today Grieg string quartet. I do not know what the bad was playing but here is what I did not record it but here is what I managed to catch from this web site:

Now Playing: String Quartet, Op. 27 by Siegerland, Sponberg, Tomter, Mork from Grieg: Mork, Cello Sonata, String Quartet (Virgin) spun by WHRB-Classical at 7:24pm on Evening Concert (Tue Sep 15th)

It was juts spectacular! I have really-really good time….

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-15-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,056
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 53
Post ID: 11752
Reply to: 11749
"From" Grieg?
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Is this Mork's transposition of a Grieg piece?

With a happy Sibelius VC under my belt, I am ready for Grieg!

Best regards,
Paul S

09-27-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 54
Post ID: 11845
Reply to: 8359
The Vaughan Williams double piano concerto.
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I never heard this work before but it is an interesting concerto. Reportedly it was composed in 20s as a regular Piano Concerto but was too difficult to play. So, Williams rearrange it for two pianos.  The recording I heard as a live concert from European Broadcasting Union with Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra under Roger Norrington. The pianist were Yaara Tal and Andreas Groethuysen. I need to listen it again but my first reaction was very positive. I like the form of the Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra…

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
10-10-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 55
Post ID: 11938
Reply to: 8359
I need to brash on Günter Wand
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Playing the Günter Wands’ recordings of the last Bruckner Symphony with NDR (North German Radio Orchestra) from 1978-88 during Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival. Another “amateur” conductor with phenomenal sound! I need a bigger place as I would like to play it VERY loud. The NDR Orchestra plays phenomenally!

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
10-11-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Axel
South Africa
Posts 80
Joined on 07-18-2009

Post #: 56
Post ID: 11939
Reply to: 11938
“amateur” conductor? Günter Wand
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Günter Wand:
born: 1912 in Elberfeld Germany, died 14th Feb. 2002 in Switzerland, age 90.
Was a German orchestra conductor and composer.

KölnerOper 1939
Intermezzo in Salzburg Austria, due to World War II issues
back in Köln in 1945, Generalmusikdirektor at the age of 34

Head of Gürzenich-Orchester see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%BCrzenich_Orchestra

Disliked jet-setting, strictly limited guest performances and disliked publicity = ~ outsider to present day music scene

1974 leaving Gürzenich-Orchester working with Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra,
recorded all of Bruckner's and Schubert's symphonies with West Deutsches Rundfunk Orchester WDR since 1977 with sensational success.
1982 chief conductor of NDR Norddeutscher Rundfunk and recorded the complete Brahms and Beethoven symphonies.

In fact one of the most extraordinary conductors of his day.... as Wolf Eberhard von Lewinski once put it.

Approach: straight forward without vanity, in style comparable to Toscanini and Klemperer, adhering strictly to score without loosing sight of what lies behind the notes.
Penetrated deeper meaning, but appealed to the senses and emotions as well.

Hm, I think this hardly qualifies as "amateur" with or without inverted commas...

Greetings,
Axel
10-11-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 57
Post ID: 11940
Reply to: 11939
The Seiji Ozawa’s pro sound vs. the “amateur” conductors…
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Well, this was why I used the “amateur” in the quotes. Amateurism described as a pursuit to something without formal qualification or professional status. Surely Günter Wand was not a sub-qualified person  and he was a professional conductor but as a professional conductor he was self-taught, the very much as Scherchen Hermann, Carlos Kleiber, Nocolay Golovanov, Asahina Takashi, Thomas Beecham and many others, including reportedly Gustav Mahler. I do not know way I say it but I very much like the status of “amateur conductor”. Perhaps I am still under the influence of that BBC program about Carlos Kleiber…

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
10-15-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 58
Post ID: 11967
Reply to: 8359
Francis Poulenc’s Concerto for Two Pianos.
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It came back to me after a few years. I heard is before with Paris Conservatory  and with all French pianists and conductor - it was very pleasant. Now it came back to me with young players from an Asia, most likely Korean CD, where I cannot read the manes.

It is a very nice light concerto with a few truly interesting moments. It looks like Poulen pulled the bits and paces from all imaginable composers but he did it tasteful and it works very nice. A good funny concerto.

The caT


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
11-17-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 59
Post ID: 12295
Reply to: 8359
Martinu’s Fantaisies Symphoniques… in Stereo!
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The Bohuslav Martinu’s last Symphony No. 6, or as it called "Fantaisies Symphoniques" that I feel is a better name (it does not sound to me as “Symphony”, too playful), is one of those secretive little treasures that no one plays, and it is a shame. I love the peaces a lot.

One might argue which conductor leads Czech Philharmonic with the most interesting interpretation of the celebrated Bohemia composer but in this case I always feel: screw the Czechs!!!  Charles Munch with my town orchestra recorded Fantaisies Symphoniques in 1956 and BSO show off such a play that I for years had no desire to look for anything else.

Recently I was hunting in Japan the Munch’s recording of Menotti concerto with BSO and when I got it came with his Fantaisies Symphoniques. I played it and was stunned – the Japanese got stereo source for my favorite Martinu 6! And I have to say – what kind stereo – the phenomenal sound, as the most of the Japanese mastering!

In stereo BSO plays even more energetically and viciously. The Japanese loose neither tone nor satellites. I did not even know that “my” Martinu was recorded in stereo.  Good discovery! When our idiots begin to make releases like this?

The caT


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
01-16-2010 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,302
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 60
Post ID: 12718
Reply to: 8359
Vaughan Williams Symphony No. 4
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Eventually I heard today the Williams’ Symphony No. 4 that I like! Sir Colin Davis with BSO in 1973 – who would believe that Williams 4 could be so good!!!

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
Page 3 of 5 (88 items) Select Pages:  « 1 2 3 4 5 »
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