| Search | Login/Register
   Home » Musical Discussions » Bruckner and women (47 posts, 3 pages)
  Print Thread | 1st Post |  
Page 2 of 3 (47 items) Select Pages:  « 1 2 3 »
02-09-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
steverino
Posts 289
Joined on 05-23-2009

Post #: 21
Post ID: 18992
Reply to: 18991
Winter music
fiogf49gjkf0d
An interesting exercise but I couldn't come up with much top quality winter music in the classical instrumental category. A lot more in pop obviously because of Xmas. I'm sure I'm missing others.

Winter Dreams Sym 1 Tchaikovsky
Sibelius Sym 4
Vivaldi  L'Inverno
Ives  Washingtons Birthday

Of course there is Schubert  Winterreise for vocal music.

For a light encore

Midnight Sun  June Christy
Hot Toddy     Julie London


03-02-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 22
Post ID: 19063
Reply to: 18985
It might be good Bruckner 4 tomorrow…
fiogf49gjkf0d
That  Bruckner 7 on Valentine Day was not good. Mariss Jansons does not “get” Bruckner and Royal Concertgebouw played not well. However, tomorrow the retched Carnegie Hall has an opportunity to recover itself.  Amy and I visit tomorrow New York with Franz Welser-Möst leading Vienna Philharmonic performing Bruckner 4. Welser-Möst is one of the most interesting alive Bruckner interpreter and Vienna Philharmonic, well there is not need to tell what Vienna Philharmonic is. I am very optimistic for tomorrow… 
 
The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
06-27-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 23
Post ID: 19568
Reply to: 18985
A gift.
fiogf49gjkf0d
 Romy the Cat wrote:
Amy the Kitten is amazing.

Well, those two events had happened today for a first time. Today I for a first time committed adultery to my wife by sleeping not with her but with a box set of records. I just woke up hugging a box set that Amy gave to me to my coming 45 birthday. It is a collection of 11 German first press records by Gunter Wand with all Bruckner symphonies and played with WDR Symphony Orchestra. The box set comes from Germany and has a nice box staffing – an article about Gunter Wand. The woman has no idea how big she hit.

BrucknerWand_BoxSet.JPG


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
06-27-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
clarkjohnsen
Boston, MA, US
Posts 290
Joined on 06-02-2004

Post #: 24
Post ID: 19569
Reply to: 19568
But the question is...
fiogf49gjkf0d
...what do you do with them?
07-01-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 25
Post ID: 19595
Reply to: 18471
Amy left me.
fiogf49gjkf0d
My Kitten left me for a week and I am enjoying a full scope of bachelor pleasures: sitting in comfy single chair while playing my music and smoking my pipe. I did not smoke in house for a year and a half and I need to admit that it is a devilish pressure.  Amy went away for a week for her annual chamber music festival where they play all day long and none of non-players are allowed. I have a lot of off-line work to do this week but today I dedicated the evening for my simple pleasure. It is Bruckner 6 now and it is my favorite Astley's No.44. I miss Dunhill London Mixture. That latakia-havy tobacco is not my typical smoke but this is what I was smoking in Hawaii where we got married and that smoke along with adagio from Bruckner 8 a perfect reminding of my Kitty.  God, I miss my Amy!!!


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
07-02-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,075
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 26
Post ID: 19605
Reply to: 19595
Smoke for Bruckner?
fiogf49gjkf0d
Perhaps you have also tried the rather delicate Astley's 109 (Virginia)?  For a not-heavy Latakia influence that is quite excellent, if you have not tried (E-T) Penzance, then do (somehow) find some of this!  For "more" than the Astley's 44, if you have not already done, you might enjoy (E-T) Tilbury, also.  For a many-layered, "reflective" evening smoke, you might like (E-T) And So To Bed (if you haven't already, of course).  It is so hot here now that it changes everything, music and pipe smoking, alike!

Best regards,
Paul S
07-04-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
de charlus
Posts 94
Joined on 06-11-2013

Post #: 27
Post ID: 19623
Reply to: 19605
Pipe Smoke
fiogf49gjkf0d
I like Davidoff English (Virginia, Burley, Latakia and a touch of Perique) and Ashton Consummate Gentleman, which I believe is a similar blend. For a slightly heavier, really rich, almost sedating smoke, Dunhill Nightcap is lovely, although I can't remember what's in it. I cannot speak to their suitability for Bruckner as I don't smoke pipes in the house, but I imagine each to be synergistic to varying degrees.

de Charlus
07-04-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 28
Post ID: 19625
Reply to: 19623
My woman is getting closer...
fiogf49gjkf0d
God! I am opening a new perspective in the site:  I can get the tobacco recommendation. :-)

Funny, funny, as now I am in JFK, expecting my fly to Rochester, NY. Amy emergency dispatched me to help her to couple with some kind of problems that he is experience at her chamber music festival and I am on my way. I put my bag my smoking box and my fav lighter was confiscated at Logan Airport. I still have my tobacco and hope will pick up some local cigars upstate NY.

Can't wait to see her...


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
07-06-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 29
Post ID: 19639
Reply to: 19623
A new smoker
fiogf49gjkf0d
This is fan time to be a smoker. I do not smoke sigar eats for probably 20 years, not even one and I do non regular cigar smoking, which sometime become regular, but I very easy break addiction. Approximately a year an a half ago I took up a pipe and since then I do more pipe tobacco then cigars. Since I am a new pipe smoker all those new tobacco sensations are novelty to me and it is in way like discovery a new music. You discover a new period or a new composer and you get non discrimitary  addicted to that since of novelty. I remember when I discovered Bruckner first I was listening it almost each day. Now, when I consider that I know Bruckner very well and I see no novelty in Bruckner I am listening in average 2 symphonies a day. Go figure....


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
07-06-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
de charlus
Posts 94
Joined on 06-11-2013

Post #: 30
Post ID: 19641
Reply to: 19639
Fun with smoking...
fiogf49gjkf0d
Romy,

Unfortunately - from a smoking perspective - you live in the U.S. Everywhere else, one has access to the whole retinue of Cuban cigars, which if you had regular access to would probably make you a more enthused cigar smoker. After all, if it weren't for Cohiba, Montecristo and a couple of smaller Cuban manufacturers, I'd probably be exclusively a pipe smoker. Pipe tobaccos tend towards far greater complexity, there being different techniques for treating and curing different tobaccos in the same blend, something that doesn't occur with cigars; this is something that holds a certain appeal for minds that tend towards the complex and/or anachronistic - audiophiles, classical music enthusiasts and other masochists in particular:-)
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
drdna
San Francisco, California
Posts 487
Joined on 10-29-2005

Post #: 31
Post ID: 19744
Reply to: 19625
Pipe Smoke and Music
fiogf49gjkf0d
One thing to note is that the cigars have an advantage in that they do not easily go out if you are absorbed in the music playing. Nevertheless, I have been much more of a pipe smoker myself in the past ten years. I have a large stockpile of aged pipe tobacco. I do enjoy Dunhill Standard Mixture Medium, Royal Yacht and Early Morning Pipe. However, it is nice to smoke a flake tobacco like Samuel Gawith, etc. as it seems less likely to go out at a moment's notice, so that I can relax and enjoy the music.

Adrian
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
drdna
San Francisco, California
Posts 487
Joined on 10-29-2005

Post #: 32
Post ID: 19745
Reply to: 19641
Pipes, Cigars, and Classical Music
fiogf49gjkf0d
I have to take exception to the idea that cigars are less complex. I would say they are more subtle and reveal themselves only after a great deal of time. Some of my favorite cigars are my Dunhill Short Coronas that have been aging since the 1970's. They have developed a truly exquisite flavor. Pipe tobacco (at least unadulterated Virginia) also ages of course, but it seems to take a long time. My tins from the 1960's are only just now coming around.

Adrian
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
de charlus
Posts 94
Joined on 06-11-2013

Post #: 33
Post ID: 19746
Reply to: 19745
Aged Tobacco
fiogf49gjkf0d
Aging cigars changes the playing field entirely, and I couldn't agree with you more about their subtle complexities. There's a bar I frequent in London - The Lanesborough Library Bar - where they have a humidor stocked with aged cigars, some pre-war, in perfect condition. Since, unlike yourself, I had not the foresight (and age) to cellar cigars/tobacco until recently, it has been fortunate that I've been able to sample such delights there for myself; I have also begun "cellaring" cigars and tobaccos - I prefer Cohiba Robusto and Esplendido, although there are many others that offer complex, delicious flavor profiles - along with wine, although I have not been doing so for long enough to fully relish the blossoming complexities. It is nice to see how they evolve over time, although I must add that aging tobacco is a more demanding pursuit than aging wine; it's not as if one can just lay them down and forget about them for 20 years, is it? Perish the thought that you forget to add water for a time, or be somehow prevented from doing so! Oh, one other thing that I wanted to mention is that the above bar has an Armagnac/Cognac list going back some 300 years, which they entitle "The Liquid History"; should one order, say, an 1812 Cognac, Napoleon's retreat from Moscow and other significant events of that year are described, which I find stimulating when drinking that year's produce. Conversely, should one wish to commemorate the battle of Trafalgar, say, one can enjoy an 1805 Armagnac there. I find that such mellow, mouthfilling yet soft, intensely complex yet graceful, exquisite brandies accompany such venerable cigars/tobaccos beautifully. Naturally, these pleasures are not cheap, but many sublime things are not.
It is not surprising that pipe tobacco takes an inordinate time to age, since the tins are hermetically sealed, unlike cigars; this is a thing that has come up in the wine industry lately too, since New World wineries are increasingly jumping on the bandwagon and bottling ever more serious wines with screw caps/artificial cork. It's a little early to make sweeping statements, but things certainly happen differently - something like a loss of character, more than aging as we recognize.
There's sufficient air in the tobacco tins and between the leaves to facilitate aging, and after all, slow aging is good aging. Very few people do it, in the case of pipe tobacco at any rate, so you'll be in a fairly unique position. The results can be remarkable; a few years back I was demolishing an old wooden barn on my parent's land, and an old jar appeared in the wreckage, which turned out to be Alfred Dunhill "My Mixture"; from the state of what was left of the label it had been somewhere cool and dark, and as far as I was able to ascertain, it was produced between 1907 and 1910. Upon opening it I was astonished to find that it possessed still a natural moistness, and its bouquet was like nothing I've ever encountered in tobacco; really rich dark chocolate, nutmeg, coffee, molasses, spices, dried fruits and leather were dominant, but there were dozens of other facets to this aroma - so complex. To smoke it was phenomenally smooth, and once more, if I had to seek adjectives to describe the palate it would be to venerable Cognac, Calvados, spice and mocha that I would look - really remarkable. Once opened the palate began to coarsen and dry up very quickly for some reason, so I had to smoke it over a period of about a week (woe). I really look forward to my own, intentionally aged cigars/tobaccos reaching such points of mellow complexity, but it will be a long while yet; you are to be congratulated upon your foresight.

Regards

de Charlus
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
drdna
San Francisco, California
Posts 487
Joined on 10-29-2005

Post #: 34
Post ID: 19747
Reply to: 19746
Music, Aged Cigars, Liquor
fiogf49gjkf0d
Regarding aged cigars, avoid anything Dominican. They do not age well. I suggest Punch and H. Uppman as the ones that have aged the best. I have a few Cuban Davidoffs and Dunhills left. They are quite sublime at this point. 

I generally avoid pairing tobacco with liquor, as the flavors and aromas are muddled and each diminished in a way, but you can read more of my opinion in my chapter in the Playboy Guide to Cigars (shameless plug!) Still, it might be fun to pair liquor and music based on the country: drinking a nice cognac while listening to the 1812 Overture or perhaps some Lagavulin while listening to Bruch's Scottish Fantasy...

Adrian
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
de charlus
Posts 94
Joined on 06-11-2013

Post #: 35
Post ID: 19748
Reply to: 19747
Lagavulin etc
fiogf49gjkf0d
Lagavulin would overwhelm just about anything, as you suggest, but really old brandies can work well in my experience. I tend to avoid Dominican cigars as a matter of principle; it's not that they're all awful, just that better cigars may easily be found. I have enjoyed some H. Uppman cigars in the past, although Punch are not among my favorites; perhaps age is what they need, because i found the last few I smoked to be a little rough and monolithic in terms of flavor profile, certainly something that time could ameliorate. If I'm approaching cigar smoking like a wine tasting - in studious terms, in other words; this is something that I do have cause to do from time to time, since I like to see how my "cellared" cigars are progressing - then I agree with you about muddling the flavors, but in terms of hedonism, in which I engage far more regularly, I like to enjoy tobacco and brandies together; the experience is just lovely, even if I don't perceive every last detail of every last aroma and flavor.

I shall certainly look at the book you mentioned; I had not yet come across it.

Regards

de Charlus
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,366
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 36
Post ID: 19749
Reply to: 19748
Another chapter or life: the married smoking
fiogf49gjkf0d
To me there is absolutely nothing as high as the last 1-2 inch of Cohiba. I do not do any drugs, hardly ever drink but the last inch of Cohiba thrown me absolutely off cliff and I for a good 10-15 minutes drifting somewhere between “here” and “there”. Unfortunately  to get Cohiba in US is very expensive and last years market is so infested with fake or with original that were not properly handles that I got very much upset buying second rate cigars and paying for it a lot of money.  My former girlfriends were OK with cigars but as Amy begin to visit me in beginning of last and eventually moved in I stopped to smoke in house. I did not smoke in house from March of last year (with one nigh exception when Amy was out for a week)  and I feel that to smoke outside any “interesting” cigars is kind of crime. When I some a good cigar I need to be in enclosed space and frankly I do not feel a need getting anything Cohiba-level to smoke on the yard. Last year I took pike and being a baby pipe smoker I have a lot of fun discovering different tobaccos. I need to admit that during the winter being outside on the cold with my either cigar or pipe I do not enjoy it too much and uselessly I go away with small 5” as my ass not getting frozen while I smoke it. That “married smoking” outside like a homeless dog do torpedo all my pleasurable experience with cigars. It is not to mention that she is an oncologist and has an understandable beef with smoking.  She naturally would like me to die being absolutely healthy, well, regardless right she or wrong but with her coming in my life I think my appreciation of good smoke is gone. 

Trying to maintain my post in context of the thread… I do remember that feeling: I am sitting at my cool and comfy listening chair with wide arms rests. It is nigh, dark and horns, basses and Wagner tubas are solemnly opening the Adagio from Bruckner 7…  There is a nice large Cohiba sitting right there on my arms rest and the glorious gray smoke rising from it act as a metronome for the whole orchestra… Well, nowadays that all is juts memories…. It is not that I am complaining about me life now but the period of good time I had with cigars is kind of over for me. If sometimes we move and I have a dedicated listening room then I can make it cigar complained but I do not like a concept of dedicated rooms. So, do you think God does exist?

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
de charlus
Posts 94
Joined on 06-11-2013

Post #: 37
Post ID: 19750
Reply to: 19749
Cigars and/or God
fiogf49gjkf0d
Well, on your London trip you could certainly visit, or stay at, The Lanesborough, and smoke some really good cigars whilst reclining in a leather-backed armchair in a library. It's very pleasurable to recline in this bar on Hyde Park corner, watching people rushing by in the rain outside, whilst one sits in the warm, cozy atmosphere of a gentleman's club indulging in the most sensual of pleasures. No music though, alas. Would it be problematic to mail a few Cohibas from Toronto to Boston? If not, then there's no reason why this shouldn't be done. I agree with you about rushing through a good cigar like a fugitive in the garden - it's almost heretical, and denudes the experience of about 90% of its pleasure. Tobacco is certainly one of the archetypal male/female battlegrounds, and I believe that we owe it to future generations of gentlemen to fight tooth and nail to sustain the existence of pleasures so uniquely masculine.

As for God, for me life is so full of transcendent experience that I have no need of God for such purposes, although I do not look down upon those capable of deriving spiritual ecstasy from the notion - it must be very nice, to say nothing of being inexpensive. Also, we do have the notion of God to thank for a great deal of very beautiful devotional music and architecture, so there is that....

Regards\

de Charlus

PS DrDNA, which of the Playboy cigar books do you refer to? It would seem that there are two.
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
drdna
San Francisco, California
Posts 487
Joined on 10-29-2005

Post #: 38
Post ID: 19751
Reply to: 19749
Cigars with music
fiogf49gjkf0d
Pipes are an excellent companion in cold weather and outdoors to be sure, but I agree a good cigar is best enjoyed at leisure indoors. My solution is that there is a fireplace in the room where I listen. I have a chair next to the fireplace, so that the smoke from the cigar goes up the flue while the log burns in the fire, so that little if any smoke gets into the house, satisfying the better half. Everyone wins!

Adrian
07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,075
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 39
Post ID: 19752
Reply to: 19749
The Cherry Orchard
fiogf49gjkf0d

The air in my small orange grove is still enough most of the time, and I actually enjoy smoking there - when weather permits and the air is - still.  If you don't yet have a garden and/or fruit trees, this is another thing to enjoy, with the added benefit of a place to meditate, albeit the local "weather" makes the evergreen orange grove pretty much a year-round proposition, while, in your case...  The only places I smoke indoors are at my tobacconist's large shop with awesome air exchange that is perfectly suited to smoking, and also my desert cabin, which might translate to sort of a mini smoking dacha, for hot or cool weather repose, on your property.  Of course, that still leaves open the question of the Bruckner...

FWIW, it has been at least 30, and maybe 40 years since I turned my speakers to fire out the windows so I could listen to music while I smoked outside my own house, and since meth heads stole the wind-up Victrola and the 78's, it's been only boom boxes or truck radios at the cabin.

Best regards,
Paul S

07-28-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
drdna
San Francisco, California
Posts 487
Joined on 10-29-2005

Post #: 40
Post ID: 19753
Reply to: 19750
God of Cigars
fiogf49gjkf0d
This harkens back to the famous story of Zino Davidoff, the forefather of all cigar merchants. A well-dressed customer came in to his shop to purchase a cigar - this was back in the days when all cigars were Cuban and smoking common. The businessman selected a corona and paid for it. Zino cut the end of the cigar carefully and inquired if the man would like him to light it for him.

"No, thanks!" said the customer. "I am on my way to work, and I'm going to smoke it on the way!"

"Ah! What a shame!" replied Zino, to the man. 

"What do you mean?" the customer asked, perplexed.

"It is a shame to waste a good cigar in such a way. A cigar is meant to be savored and enjoyed..."

In a huff, the customer departed, but several minutes later returned and admitted Zino's wisdom, spending the next half hour relaxing in an armchair at Zino's shop, enjoying his cigar.

Adrian
Page 2 of 3 (47 items) Select Pages:  « 1 2 3 »
Home Page  |  Last 24Hours  | Search  |  SiteMap  | Questions or Problems | Copyright Note
The content of all messages within the Forums Copyright © by authors of the posts