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06-03-2007 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,285
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 1
Post ID: 4538
Reply to: 4538
Where is the real Russian music lives?
 amperidian wrote:
To me Russian music is not about joy and musicality (unless you specifically consider Tchaikovsky), but instead it tends to portray the bleak and tragic history of that nation and the iron will that was forged through it. 
Interestingly, I do not consider Tchaikovsky as a Russian composer. Sure he was Russian, very much Russian, but did he compose music that might be recognized as real Russian music? Although he used a number of folk tunes but I do not fell that his music has Russian sound. Tchaikovsky was a “freak” on his own, similar to Mussorgsky or Scrabin or Myaskovski, and their music is belong own category, although defiantly it have very strong tendency to be Slave music.

So, what king music from my point of view shot itself off as the pure Russian music. I think Glinka, Alyabiev, Borodin, Balakirew, Rimsky-Korssaskov, Lyadov, Bortnyansky, Chesnokov, Rakhmaninov did the true Russian sound with probably Prokofiev attached to them in 20 century. However, I do not feel that later on Shostakovich, Stravinsky, Schnittke, Tscherepnin, Schedrin, Glasunov and many others did the true Russian Music and true Russian Sound.

I also do not see Russian music as some kind of “depicture of bleak and tragic history”, quite opposite – to me Russian music it rather a “brainless exuberance” then the  depicture  of gloom and tragedy. I feel that the “tragic history” twist was invented on West in order to “spice up” perception of Russian music (good for accounts receivables). Ironically that “spicing up of Russian musical drama” went alone very well after the WWII when the entire Western culture lead by the trumpets of American military-industrial complex built up an idiotic image of demonic and evil-minded Russia.

In reality, the Russian music is about absurd bliss and musical ecstasy, in many cases overly simplistic ecstasies. It is more about very crude and unsophisticated harvesting of joy then about reflecting upon the tragic history. I do not think that Russian history is necessarily more tragic then many others. Jews history is in a way tragic but you do not necessarily say that Jewish music it bleak and tragic. As far as I feel there is something in Russians culturally close to the “village idiots” who despite of the event keep laughing, even if the laughing is not really warranted.

The Jews had in their disposal sarcasm. Germans had in this disposal talents. Europe had in it’s disposal traditions and capacity. The Russians had in their disposal ability do not pay attention and do not care.  Sure, the West always has in its disposal the accountants….

Rgs,
Romy the caT


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
06-03-2007 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
op.9
Planet Earth
Posts 68
Joined on 01-26-2007

Post #: 2
Post ID: 4539
Reply to: 4538
you missed..
Pure Russian music? You have missed out the great master Tanayev! Almost alone, he manages to combine that true Russian sound with our counterproductive western accountantcy.



everybody used to call me James in my past other-worldly life.
06-03-2007 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,285
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 3
Post ID: 4540
Reply to: 4539
All roads lead to the convoluted Scriabin
 op.9 wrote:
Pure Russian music? You have missed out the great master Tanayev! Almost alone, he manages to combine that true Russian sound with our counterproductive western accountantcy.
Actually it was not Tanayev but Taneyev. Despise the change of juts one letter they have VERY different pronunciation in Russian. Tanayev was a famous communist-bureaucrat in Soviet Union.

Anyhow, surely I do not express ambition that among the few names that dropped I mentioned the all pure Russian composers. There were also Kalinnikov, Dargomizhsky (love both), Gretchaninov and many others. However, I do not consider Taneyev as a person who had pure Russian sound. I’ rather see him as a bypass between Russian music to Scriabin.

Rgs, The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
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