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  »  New  Alessandro Baricco's "Lesson 21" or the chall..  Alessandro Baricco did it, again!...  Musical Discussions  Forum     13  58446  11-20-2008
11-02-2006 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,534
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 1
Post ID: 3080
Reply to: 3080
Film about Jacqueline du Pre.








Courtesy to Bostonian Yubo Bao...


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
11-22-2008 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
twogoodears


Italy
Posts 116
Joined on 03-26-2008

Post #: 2
Post ID: 8933
Reply to: 3080
A Great Persona...
fiogf49gjkf0d
Thanks for sharing, Roman... I remember I fell in love for Jaqueline Du Prè since I purchased, eons ago, a double record-set on EMI... she was so easy and elegant, so innocent and... the playing: WOW!
I guess tomorrow will be Du Prè's Day on my turntable...


"Use your ears as your eyes" - Gertrude Stein

Stefano
11-22-2008 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,534
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 3
Post ID: 8934
Reply to: 8933
The Du Pre’ talks.
fiogf49gjkf0d

Yep, the Du Pre might be a subject of endless talks. As much as Mussorgsky I consider was the most natural raw talent among all composers as much Du Pre was probably the most natural rawest talents among the musicals of 20 century. There are a few mistakes in the film above. Her infamies cello was not given to her by “anonymous donor” but was purchased for her by her godmother for $100k or something like this.

There is a lot of interesting things about the Du Pre’s instrument. In my signature line I use Nietzsche’s point that for a writer his writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts. Nietzsche made this observation after he switched from hand writing to typewriter and then with time he begin to observe that his prose, his way the construct sentences and his ways to express his thoughts in writing begun to change after the introduction of the typewriter. The same is with Du Pre’s instrument. It is unthinkable to imagine Du Pre’s Elgar concerto without the sound of that Davodoff’s Cello.  When I use within my site the phrases like “Absolute Tone” in drivers or cartridges is was exactly what I mean – under the best other conditions, what absolute magnitude of tone quality an instrument (cello, cartridge, driver etc) is able to show off. In the case of Davodoff’s Cello, and particularly in the Du Pre’s hands it was like nothing else. Interesting that after Du Pre the Davodoff does not shine as it use to be. It underwent a few restorations and modification and I feel it become darker, bolder and a way louder. It kind of lost that “fragility” that it use to have under Du Pre. I know that a few years back Yo-Yo Ma who own Davodoff for years broke off the cello neck (an accident in airport), then it was rebuilt, perhaps it made the difference.  Rostropovich played the same quality of instrument and he had the similar Absolute Tone with his Duport Strad but he got it in mid 70s and the most ”interesting” times of the “young” Rostropovich he did not use “great” instrument.

Among what Du Pre did the story with her Elgar concerto is the most remarkable. In the film it is referred as one of the greatest concerto ever written but it do not think so. I in fact feel that many things in the Elgar Cello Concerto do not make sense. In fact I do not like it at all, well, except in the Du Pre version.  What is in a way sad in this hall story is that Du Pre closed up the Elgar Cello Concerto for any further interpretations, literally killing this work for future cellists. The same Rostropovich said that “there is nothing more can be expressed in Elgar Cello Concerto” in addition to what Du Pre did and refused to play/record this work after Du Pre. I have heard a few attempts by different cellist to play the Elgar Concerto and they were trying to do a different something that I call “anti- Du Pre” version. I think it was a smart move and it is impossible to beat her in her version of the concert. They went away from the Du Pre’s melancholy and glumness and played it more “victorious” and less melodramatic. They did OK but then the “weakness” of the composition itself exposed under the new light pretty much killed the effect of the concert. It is interesting is anyone will find other ways to read the speak by the Elgar Cello Concerto. If not then it will lastingly be known as the Elgar-Du Pre’s concert.

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
11-23-2008 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Lbjefferies7
Southern California
Posts 49
Joined on 01-11-2008

Post #: 4
Post ID: 8936
Reply to: 8934
Du Pre Day
fiogf49gjkf0d
I haven't played Du Pre in a while, so I too will be absorbing her genius tomorrow, followed by a donation to the National MS Society.  Her performances of Haydn, Boccerini, Schumann, and (of course) Elgar's Cello Concerti inspired me to assemble a system to deeper explore music with meaning.  I owe her much... And I am sure tears will be shed tomorrow.

Respectfully,
LBJ

P.S. Romy, I now fully understand "Absolute Tone."
Thank you.



I'm not interested in having an orchestra sound like itself. I want it to sound like the composer. Leonard Bernstein
11-23-2008 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
twogoodears


Italy
Posts 116
Joined on 03-26-2008

Post #: 5
Post ID: 8944
Reply to: 8936
Du Prè Day "On Air"
fiogf49gjkf0d
Yes... Jacqueline Du Prè really "is" Elgar's Op. 85 Cello Concert... just listened to "Allegro Molto" and now enjoying "Adagio"... she's just right, raw and passionate and free and easy.
I was thinking few minutes ago: isn't something so... so... GREAT... sharing this great music all together?
I imagine people on the 6 continents;-) all playing Du Pre' discs and music... an Esperanto-like, peaceful, lovingly act.
...  some credits also to Sir Barbirolli's direction, of course.
... now playing "Allegro ma non troppo"... must stop writing and simply sitting on the couch and listen to fully enjoy and appreciate the fluency, the art, the awfully difficult made easy... ahhhh, those double basses and those tympanis...  


"Use your ears as your eyes" - Gertrude Stein

Stefano
11-24-2008 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,534
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 6
Post ID: 8955
Reply to: 8944
Barbirolli, Barbirolli, Barbirolli….
fiogf49gjkf0d

 twogoodears wrote:
...  some credits also to Sir Barbirolli's direction, of course.

Last night a local audio guy visited me and it happened that I played for him the Du Prè Elgar. As many times I played the pices as many times I absolutely mesmerized how stunning Barbirolli's orchestra “airs” the soloist. I have a few of versions the Barbirolli/Du Prè/Elgar collaboration and the feeling that Barbirolli had to support Du Prè play is truly remarkable . (Well, Barbirolli is one of my all time favorite conductor and I do not need a lot to be memorized by him). This “setting” of Du Prè doing pretty much whatever she wants and Barbirolli just ambiance whatever she does in the best imaginable way is so sensual and it sounds even erotic.  Interesting that none of the orchestras of the Jacqueline’s husband ever reached that level of eroticisms as Barbirolli had. Well, Barenboim was usually way les interesting conductor then Barbirolli and it fact Barenboim was getting worse after the Du Pre’s demise.  Perhaps it was what called the conducting professionalism? From another side Barbirolli was one of the few conductors whose amassing  techniques  and taste allowed his orchestras to sound as soft is possible and as slow and possible, while not losing the texture of music.  Perhaps it was something that helped  Barbirolli to get in tune with Du Pre’s decays…

Would it be “fun” once to catch a concert like this….

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
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  »  New  Alessandro Baricco's "Lesson 21" or the chall..  Alessandro Baricco did it, again!...  Musical Discussions  Forum     13  58446  11-20-2008
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