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11-12-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,545
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 1
Post ID: 20260
Reply to: 20260
A Cardboard Effect.
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I have seen this effect before not frequently in my playback however. It happens that I did not listen my main playback attentively for 2 months. Frankly I did not even turn it on for a month or so. With many other things that are going now in my life when I listen my music I do not use main playback. It is not that I have no interests but there are other priorities now in my radars. The main playback is sits there unused which is fine, I will be back.

A 2-3 weeks ago an local audio guy came to listed my playback and I played to him it from the dead cold state. He said that it did not sound as good as use to be and it was about it. Not a lot of high-end audio activities are doing on now.

Anyhow, a few days ago I developer some nostalgia for good sound and I desired to spend an evening with in listening room.  I tuned the playback on and let it to burn for good 12 hours; I do not know that after long non-working it sounds “hard”.

I played a few tunes and with very first bar I heard that something is very wrong. First of all it was bright and send of all it had that Cardboard Effect. The Cardboard Effect is a situation when sound sounds like it bounds from a huge thin cardboard shit and I clearly hear the cardboard contributions. It is not electricity or anything like this but rather the untrained drivers suspensions, or at least it is my hypnotizes. So, last night I set a tuner between stations and was running FM static at high volumes for good 8 hours into Macondo. Today I will be seeing if the breaking in the drivers this way would fix my Cardboard Effect. If not then I will leave the playback to run my test sweep noise for another 12 hours.

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
11-12-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,157
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 2
Post ID: 20261
Reply to: 20260
Icing Up
fiogf49gjkf0d
When I am away from my system for long-ish spells, it seems like all the components need serious actual play time before they begin to sound like I mean for them to.  The usual warm-up alone is not enough once there has been a hiatus of a certain duration; I have not yet figured out how long would be the minimum, exactly, but a couple of weeks will do it every time.

Best regards,
Paul S
11-14-2013 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,545
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 3
Post ID: 20264
Reply to: 20260
Yep, that did it.
fiogf49gjkf0d
Yes, it did it. A nice blow of the system with signal did wipe out the cardboard effect. It took one day 5 house and another day 5 hours of strong noise to run across the speakers.  The sound lost hardness, lost that washy-washy flatness of cardboard effect and become again soft, liquid and holographic.

So, what was it? The drivers’ suspension? That is the only thing that I can blame but it kind of sound contra-intelligent, doesn’t it?

The caT.


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
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