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09-07-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,130
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 1
Post ID: 11688
Reply to: 11688
Multiple Tracks, Each One Bandwidth-Limited?!?
fiogf49gjkf0d
OK, this has to be another problem caused by the bad electricity, right?

I was comparing two "Eroicas" when it struck me that one was especially weird in terms of "engineering".

The weird one is a DGG, circa 1972, Bohm conducting the VPO.

The weirdness is not that multiple tracks are used and are audible as such, since this is, after all, quite common. Likewise, it is all too common to limit different bands differently with respect to volume, if only to ensure audibility of delicate passages and prevent overload, apropos, with some presumption on the recording engineer's part as to just where the critical overload point or points might be.

In the case of this DGG, the weirdness is that each of the multiple tracks seems to be bandwidth-limited, as though the engineer has decided to "optimize" each track according to his own perception of a particular instrument or section's pitch, tone, or whatever.  But, of course, it just kills timbre, interplay and dynamics and pretty well drains the music of its Sound base.

This did not dawn on me immediately.  My initial reaction was merely that something generic was missing from the Sound that was preventing the Music.  I thought at first that sections sounded oddly "congested".  But as soon as I homed in on the problem the nature of the beast was all too apparent.

This is the first time I have isolated this particular problem.

Anyone else ever run accross it?


Paul S

09-07-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,495
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 2
Post ID: 11690
Reply to: 11688
I think it has nothing to do with mastering or electricity
fiogf49gjkf0d
I do not think it is possible to get anything from your description about the way how it was mastered. I do not see anybody would "optimize each track according to his own perception of a particular instrument“. The 1972 was the time when DG experimented with first digital recording – so any is possible.  But most likely you got just a bad copy of the record. DG records, particularly from 70s might hit and miss, most of misses and they might be anything you want, or not to what in this case. It also does not help the DG has no well defend marking to know what pressing batch you got. So, get another 2-3 records of you like the performance and it is possible that you will get a better one.

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-07-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,130
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 3
Post ID: 11692
Reply to: 11690
I Hope So
fiogf49gjkf0d

I agree that it sounds unlikely, hence the incredulity factor (?!?) in the header.  However, I admit being facinated, in a morbid sort of way.

Each individual channel/track seems to come "down a chute" about 1 1/2 octaves wide, with each channel/track/chute centered on a different frequency.

It is not only weird, it is kind of creepy!

Sorry to say, I sort of lost track of the quality of the performance once I got wind of the "track" thing; but your explanation is interesting enough that I will indeed watch for the "same" performance, and then I will compare copies.

Also, interesting note that DGG started messing with the digital in the early 70s!  IMO, they were already a mixed bag by the mid/late 60s.


Best regards,
Paul S

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