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09-01-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,486
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 1
Post ID: 11639
Reply to: 11639
Drama vs. Chic
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A few years back, instructing young photographers, I was trying to pitch them an idea that “dramatic” depicting of a bride is not compatible with presenting her in chic format. Drama and chic are in a way antagonistic concept where one destroys another. Well, put in this way – it is possible to tell the weeding story in both dramatic AND chic format but it requires a LOT of efforts to orchestrate the events in necessary format, much, much more efforts then people even willing to pay at weeding. So, the drama vs. chic are both valid approaches but diametrically opposed approaches.

Today I got a phenomenal illustration of the concept.

I kind of lost interest to other Rachmaninoff’s Second Symphonies after Golovanov’s incinerating play with Russian Radio Orchestra from 1945 and here it comes again. I spin today a live performance of the Second from August 1946 where Stokowski led Hollywood Bowl Symphony. It is VERY different take on Rachmaninoff then what Golovanov had.

Golovanov is hereditarily dramatic. In his admirably style Golovanov eliminates the micro-drama and he paints a large super-drama. Golovanov does not hunt with a snapper ruffle; he hunts with artillery of 405mm caliber. He does not deliver juts “drams” he bring total dramatic annihilation.

Then Stokowski with his Hollywood Bowl orchestra. The very same music but with drained down drama. Stokowski does not play drama, instead he plays that chic. It in away reminds the Brazilians play football, ok nowadays everyone learned how to imitate them, but still we all know where it comes from. Stokowski plays Rachmaninoff’s Second with sophistication and ccultivated distinction, it is full of orchestral refinement or delicacy, the Stokowski’s phases are the finesse itself. Very different view from Golovanov, equally brilliant however.

I played Stokowski’s performances twice today. Interesting what would Rachmaninoff’s feel about those two takes on his work.

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
09-02-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Paul S
San Diego, California, USA
Posts 2,104
Joined on 10-12-2006

Post #: 2
Post ID: 11643
Reply to: 11639
The Master Speaks
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Any good recordings of Rachmaninoff playing or conducting his own works?

The last time I heard R play his own 3rd PC I did not listen through.

Seems like there would have to be some nice examples...

Best regards,
Paul S.
09-02-2009 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,486
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 3
Post ID: 11644
Reply to: 11643
Rachmaninoff conducts Rachmaninoff
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It would be interesting to hear the Rachmaninoff’s own take on the Second Symphony. Unfortunately he did not leave this recording. As a conductor, Rachmaninoff recorded only Third Symphony, Isle of the Dead, and Vocalise.

The Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
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