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10-22-2010 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,301
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 1
Post ID: 14768
Reply to: 14768
My reading for a “smaller room in the house”
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In my bathroom there is two type of literature: toilet reading and bath reading.  

The toilet reading is mostly audio publications about equipment. While I am on toilet then good 4 pagers review about some kind of flagman speaker or amplifies take me to glance no longer then top pass a half dose of chicken wings.

The bath reading is different. I do not like showers and love soaking bath. In my new house I installed 95 gallon bath with a nice heating lamp - in can sit in the bath for a good hour reading. The reading for bath is very different. Right next to me in Burlington there a huge use book store and I frequently by in there books s for my submarine reading.

In this hared I will be sharing more music-related books that made my bath reading.

For instant the last nigh I started to read a highly entertaining book by John Sant'Ambrogio “The Day I Almost Destroyed the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Other Stories”. The guy is a lead cellist who spent on stage 50 years and played over 10000 concerts. He, with great humor is reminiscing many stories that took with him on orchestras around the world – a wonderful reading. I think each accomplished music shall write a book like this…

Rgs, Romy the Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
02-05-2011 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
Romy the Cat


Boston, MA
Posts 9,301
Joined on 05-28-2004

Post #: 2
Post ID: 15539
Reply to: 14768
The Marconi's Dream….
fiogf49gjkf0d

My current book for my bathroom reading is Greg Milner‘s book “Perfecting Sound Forever: An Aural History of Recorded Music “

http://www.amazon.com/Perfecting-Sound-Forever-Recorded-ebook/dp/B0030CHEYU/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

It is interesting read; it has a lot of good stories that allow putting the things in perspective, historical perspectives, cultural perspectives, technical perspectives….  However, while I was reading, I certainly enjoyed it but from a different perspective I surprisingly to myself found then whole audio subject of abstractive Audio is too boring. It is not that audio is boring but I rather feel that I do not want learn about general audio.  To me audio is what I do and my immediate experiences. History of audio is fine, learning about practical experiences and people from past is fine but I do not feel that my practical interests in audio in anyway derived from audio past.

Sure, I do understand intellectually that it is not the case but it is how I feel. I caught myself that reading about history of audio I feel as if I would read about history of Manhattans Project of about history of slavery in Brazil. They all educational subjects of cause but they have absolutely nothing to do with I do, it expends horizons but it has no impact to anything tangible in my live.

I do not know if I enjoy reading about audio history, I find it is interesting but not enjoyable… it has nothing to do with Greg Milner writing but perhaps with my rejection of that Asian inner-family live style… Anyhow, that is the book, someone might like it.

Rgs, Romy the Cat


"I wish I could score everything for horns." - Richard Wagner. "Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts." - Friedrich Nietzsche
05-28-2011 Post does not mapped to Knowledge Tree
scooter
Posts 161
Joined on 07-17-2008

Post #: 3
Post ID: 16350
Reply to: 15539
Tokyo - magazines and music stores
fiogf49gjkf0d
I am in Tokyo now and there are some very large used bookstores. These stock lots of old copies of audio review magazines which have the merit of being in Japanese. The obvious benefit is that most people can easily ignore any reviews or editorials while flipping through the colorful pages.
Another thing that struck me about Japan is that the (popular) music industry in general appears to be much more "healthy" than it is in the US and Europe. At least in Tokyo there are plenty of music super-stores, music billboards, advertisements, etc. It's like a time warp back to 1985.

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